Dreams

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Dreams

Postby Pennypims » Thu Apr 28, 2011 12:33 pm

I've been having some weird dreams, and have started "acting out" I'm going to move into the guest room. My Hubby can't sleep with my foolishness. I guess I'm a little down today. I brought up the subject of nursing homes and how we should re-deed our home to be in just his name. We also have a small home at the beach. Out of the blue I realized that it wouldn't ever be MY retirement home.
Well, now that I've totally depressed everyone, I think I'll take a nap. :(
This stuff stinks!!
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Postby Robin » Thu Apr 28, 2011 1:49 pm

Penny,
I suggest speaking with your neurologist about your acting our your dreams. If this is RBD (REM sleep behavior disorder), this would be a *strong* indication you do NOT have PSP, but have one of the synucleinopathies - MSA, DLB, or PD. RBD can be treated with medication (usually Klonopin is given) but it is a good idea for the "bed partner" to sleep in a different bed (often, a different room).
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sleep problem

Postby Pennypims » Thu Apr 28, 2011 2:21 pm

Robin,

Thanks for your advice. I have an appointment with a neuropthamologist next week & will talk with her about this. Maybe this is the reason they haven't been too quick about choosing psp or msa. Also, I'm taking Xanax at bedtime.
This stuff stinks!!
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Postby Robin » Thu Apr 28, 2011 2:45 pm

Penny,
I doubt the neuro-ophthalmologist will be willing to assess (by ordering a sleep study) or treat the RBD, but you can try!
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Postby eplowman » Thu Apr 28, 2011 7:41 pm

Penny,

Not knowing more than your brief description, I would not rule out an adverse reaction to one or more medications as the reason for "acting out" a vivid dream. We know that hallucinations (some people might prefer to call them delusions) are common side effects with some medicines given to PSP patients (as per a number of reports here in the forum over the years). We know that the levodopa drugs, for example, are among them. But there are others as well.

My late wife Rose was prescribed a popular simple sleep aid to help her relax and fall asleep sooner, She took the first pill at 9 p.m. one night. At midnight or so, we both were asleep (we slept in the same bed together during the entire course of her illness), and suddenly, she awakened, grabbed my arm, and starting shouting, "We need to get out of here! We're sleeping in another man's bed! We need to go to our own bed! Get up, get up, help me get up, hurry!" She was shaking my arm, and her eyes were wide open. By then, our live-in caregiver was awake, and came to her side, trying to calm her. Rose wanted out of bed and to be dressed -- "We need to go to our own little room." I told her it was all just a bad dream, we were together in our own apartment and bed, try to go back to sleep. She would hear none of it. The caregiver got her up and took her to the bathroom. Rose was still VERY agitated. She refused to go back to bed. I put my robe on and sat with her in the kitchen, pointing out all the same familiar surroundings and reminding her how long we had lived here. I emphasized that she had had a very bad dream. She insisted it was not a dream. I asked her where this "little room" was that she wanted us to go to. She said it was "up above the attic, under the roof." I asked her where the man was that owned the apartment and the bed where we were. "He's away, but he'll be back any minute. We need to go, now!"

She finally allowed us to put her back in bed, but she remained agitated and active for a long time. If she were able, I swear she would have climbed the stairs and headed for the attic! She remained agitated all through the day and into the next night. I suspected the sleeping pill, and didn't give her another one. I tried to explain to her that she had experienced a hallucination as an unwanted side effect of the sleeping pill. "It was the same as a very bad nightmare," I told her. Many weeks later, when the matter came up again in small talk, she could remember every detail of what she had "seen and heard," and said, "It wasn't a dream." I told her I believed her. "Most dreams are forgotten right away. But hallucinations are not. They are like a dream, but much more vivid and 'real' seeming."

Yes, I'm aware of the research and discussion about REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD), and probably had a few "acting out" dreams of my own in younger years. Maybe you do have RBD. But if it hasn't been a pattern in the past and if you are taking levodopa (like Sinemet) or tranquilizers, etc., and especially if the onset of the "acting out" experiences began shortly after starting a new drug, then I would want to have a consultation with the neurologist (one who is very knowledgeable about PSP) about these "new" symptoms and whether the drugs have =known= benefits that outweigh the risk of adverse effects. The neuro may take you off the drug(s) temporarily to see in the "acting out" episodes go away.

Let's hope and pray that you can get your bed mate back!

By the way, it's great that you will be seen by a neuropthalmologist. That doctor will observe closely the movement of your eyes. On our very first visit to a neurologist to seek an answer to occasional unexplained falls, Rose passed all the gait and balance tests just fine. Then the neuro had her follow movements of his pen around her eyes. He diagnosed her with PSP as a result of what he saw. He said he was "98 percent confident" it was PSP, and he sent us to Johns Hopkins for a second opinion, where the neurology team, under Dr. Reich, confirmed the diagnosis. I was impressed! Today, I visited my ophthalmologist, and we talked a bit about PSP. Over the years,he has referred some people who came to him for an eye exam to a neurologist because he spotted the eye movements associated with PSP. If the neurophthalmologist you see notices the tell-tale signals of PSP, you can be quite confident of the diagnosis.

Let us know the outcome of that appointment.

We'll keep you in our thoughts and prayers.

ed p.
|My wife of 56 years was Rose b. 1930, dx 1999, symptoms from 1997; d. 06/21/08; PSP-rs autopsy confirmed.
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