Roll Tide!! 37 - 21


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Roll Tide!! 37 - 21

Postby willru602 » Fri Jan 08, 2010 3:27 pm

If you're an Alabama Crimson Tide Fan....then I hear ya yellin Roll Tide! We were proud to walk away with the Nationial Football Championship trophy last night in Pasadena, CA!

Those Longhorns played an excellent game and the young man who was hurt gained my deepest respect when he was interviewed. Not being a huge sports fan, I don't remember his name but he was a key player and a fellow named Ingram took his place...anyhow, am hoping the injured young man is not seriously/permanantly hurt. He certainly showed the true spirit of sportsmanship, Texas and God in his replies to the interview.

I know Tam Bredmeyer whose Dad had PSP, was sorely disappointed because he is a loyal Hook'em Fan....Exciting game...

Ru
http://photobucket.com/albums/i76/willru602/
But they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint. Isaiah 40:31
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Postby eplowman » Fri Jan 08, 2010 9:11 pm

Yes, roll on, Tide. Having lived in Texas for a few years, I was sort of rooting for the Longhorns to pull it out -- especially after Texas star quarterback Colt McCoy was hurt with a numbing shoulder injury early in the game, as you indicated, and the inexperienced freshman Garrett Gilbert took his place.

Gosh, the Gilbert kid passed for two touchdowns, and with just three minutes left on the clock, Texas was behind by only three points (24-21) -- and took possession of the ball on the seven-yard-line. At that point, it was another exciting bowl game, like some of the other bowl games of the past week or so. But then things fell apart. Gilbert got hit from the blind side (see that current movie, The Blind Side, if you can!*), and lost the ball. The Tide scored twice in quick succession, making the final score seem more lopsided than most of the game deserved.

It was great to see Alabama's Heisman Trophy winner Mark Ingram at work, helping to bring back the glory the Tide achieved under Bear Bryant! And the Longhorn fans will see great things from Garrett Gilbert in the years ahead, I think. Provided his left guard and tackle keep his blind side protected! :)

*The movie, The Blind Side, is a true story about a southern Christian family who took a big African American high schooler from a troubled background into their home, shepherded him through Ole Miss university, where he became a football star, and was signed by the Baltimore Ravens in the NFL, where he is today. A film the entire family will enjoy.

ed p.
Last edited by eplowman on Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
|My wife of 56 years was Rose b. 1930, dx 1999, symptoms from 1997; d. 06/21/08; PSP-rs autopsy confirmed.
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Postby willru602 » Fri Jan 08, 2010 9:32 pm

Ed, my husband was a huge Bear Bryant fan in his day and while sports is not my favorite pass time, I do enjoy the excitement of football. We had family rivalry going on last night too, which was quite interesting.. ha..Our Auburn son in law turned Texas Longhorn while our Bama son in law held his own in the feud.

Will was pretty perky when the Longhorns made the field goal scores and he held out till Alabama was in the lead...but fell asleep before half time. He would have really enjoyed the game!

Hope you had a Merry first Christmas without Rose. I thought about you and so many of the others who were experiencing the first year.
Hospice came out Christmas Eve and told us that Will had only a few hours and at the most two days...but guess what....he's still with us and doing better! God is still in control...Ru
http://photobucket.com/albums/i76/willru602/
But they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint. Isaiah 40:31
willru602
 
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Location: Alabama, USA

Postby eplowman » Sat Jan 09, 2010 1:19 am

A good word, Ru. Thanks.

One small correction: this was my =second= Christmas without my dear wife of 56 years. The first one was tough. Memories weighed heavily this time, too, but I'm slowly adjusting to MY new normal. Life is brighter, and I'm enjoying it more. I took my grandkids to see The Blind Side movie, we enjoyed family gatherings and church programs, and, earlier, heading into the Christmas season, we made the five-hour trip to the Texas Tech stadium south of Roanoke to watch our local high school (Broad Run High School, Ashburn, Va.) football team win the state AA championship game, the second year in a row. My oldest grandson is a senior who plays a mean trombone in the marching band. My middle grandson will be playing football next season, unless the school system scraps freshman football, as other districts have done around here due to budget constraints.

I'm still writing for publication, am working on another book, and am helping with a widows and widowers support group at church.

If I had been smart, I would have planned to spend the winter in San Diego with my daughter and the many friends I have there. :) Al Gore notwithstanding, we are having one of our coldest winters in history in our neck of the woods, including a historic snow storm. I believe you 'bamans are having to bundle up more than usual, too.

Stay warm.

ed p.
|My wife of 56 years was Rose b. 1930, dx 1999, symptoms from 1997; d. 06/21/08; PSP-rs autopsy confirmed.
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Postby willru602 » Sat Jan 09, 2010 8:53 am

Ed, I apologize for my dated mistake...good indication that my brain is not working with a full charge! ha Maybe the reason I said that is because I printed out the post you wrote here on the Forum for our hospice nurse to read just before Christmas..about Rose's passing. She as well as our caregiver found it interesting that Rose had a meal the night before.

What a blessing to be so talented and able to stay busy...no room for idleness but always reaching out to others, even here on the Forum. You said you are working on "another book"....I should be embarrassed to ask because it's probably Forum knowledge...but can I purchase a book written by you? As I said earlier, my brain isn't working with a full charge. Would your books be in Lifeway stores?

Our youngest daughter played alto sax in her high school band (Andalusia Marching Bulldogs), so needless to say, we didn't miss a football game for 4 years! ha

Yes...it's been near 25 + years since we had such a long spell of cold weather in the southeast. Will was always out checking pipes to make sure they were well insulated and that the generator was working and that we had everything we needed in case we lost power...which we did lose power back in the early 80's with the ice storm. I sure miss having him do all those things but I have family and friends who would be here if needed..so am grateful for that.

Pulling out the longhandles...ha
Ru
http://photobucket.com/albums/i76/willru602/
But they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint. Isaiah 40:31
willru602
 
Posts: 1011
Joined: Mon Apr 14, 2003 4:39 pm
Location: Alabama, USA

Postby eplowman » Sat Jan 09, 2010 5:14 pm

Ru,

Edited in response to your post below:

I don't recall which post you are referring to re. Rose and a meal the night before she died. In her final weeks, it was very difficult for her to swallow any food without choking and aspiration. I had to do a number of Heimlichs the final two weeks, and our caregiver was spending two to three hours trying to feed her just a little, with me spelling her (the caregiver) at intervals. I could tell for weeks that Rose wanted us to stop trying to feed her, but I just couldn't bring myself to ask the fateful question. It got so bad I felt we were torturing her by attempting to force feed, and that made me feel worse. I finally asked her during that final week (probably Wed.) if she wanted us to stop trying to feed her. She held up a thumb and managed to grunt a "Yeh-h-h!" She seemed VERY relieved. My recollection (thanks to your jogging my memory -- see below) is that we got a little liquid into her that Wed. and Thurs. night, but we didn't prepare anything for her to eat on Thurs. She had always handled lightly fried Cod filet best, I fixed some, and she agreed to try to get it down. It was just a few bites -- with no choking! It was her final meal. She stopped breathing in the pre-dawn hours of Saturday. The hospice nurse, who had visited the preceding Wed, and approved our plan to ask Rose if she wanted us to stop feeding her, had planned to visit again on Monday and probably start administering morphine.

Your memory jog (below) really helped to bring things back into focus. Thank you. It did NOT reopen any wounds at all; it was a matter of revisiting now precious memories, and rejoicing anew that Rose was delivered from having to suffer through two more Christmases!

I apologize for taking your joyous Crimson Tide post off topic! My late dad, a tough military guy and ardent sports fan, never set foot in Alabama. But like so many others who followed the Tide from a distance, he was a HUGE Bear Bryant fan. To him, Bear was like a general who knew how to get his troops in shape to kick butt and win. A man's man.

ed p.
Last edited by eplowman on Sun Jan 10, 2010 12:26 am, edited 3 times in total.
|My wife of 56 years was Rose b. 1930, dx 1999, symptoms from 1997; d. 06/21/08; PSP-rs autopsy confirmed.
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Postby willru602 » Sat Jan 09, 2010 6:12 pm

Ed, I'm sorry again ... I feel like I'm drudging up sad memories for you and I really did not have that in mind when I brought this up...I just thought it was a beautiful post and wanted the nurse to read it. Also wanted wanted to point out that not all psp patients follow protocol to the end. I recall others from the old Listserv but of course those posts are not available. There's nothing wrong with your memory and I told the nurse that Rose had had problems eating but it was just amazing that she rallied to eat one of her favorite foods on the night she passed.

I took the liberty to pull up the first lines of the original posts...forgive me please.

Ru

************************************************************************************

My dearest Rose entered heaven's glory early Saturday morning (June 21).

It was a quick and smooth transition, just as she and the rest of us had prayed and hoped it would be. I had fried some fresh wild cod for her on Friday evening, one of her favorite foods and one of the few she could eat without it being puree'd. She didn't aspirate or choke at all -- a rare surprise. She had been on the verge of stopping eating altogether earlier in the week.


The caregiver got her ready for bed, Rose and I enjoyed a TV show together, then we put her down for the night at 9 p.m. I massaged her back (she had learned to sleep on her stomach to avoid choking on saliva buildup), gave her a squeeze and a kiss and told her, "I love you." She grunted approval. Next, I read to her from "Dear Jesus," a wonderful, Scripture-saturated book of devotions and prayers by Sarah Young, then played Wintley Phipps's album of Billy Graham's favorite hymns. She went to sleep to the accompaniment of those heavenly sounds.


eplowman wrote:Ru,

I don't recall which post you are referring to re. Rose and a meal the night before she died. In her final weeks, it was very difficult for her to swallow any food without choking and aspiration. I had to do a number of Heimlichs the final two weeks, and our caregiver was spending two to three hours trying to feed her just a little, with me spelling her (the caregiver) at intervals. I could tell for weeks that Rose wanted us to stop trying to feed her, but I just couldn't bring myself to ask the fateful question. It got so bad I felt we were torturing her by attempting to force feed, and that made me feel worse. I finally asked her going into that final weekend if she wanted us to stop trying to feed her. She held up a thumb and managed to grunt a "Yeh-h-h!" She seemed VERY relieved. My recollection is that we got a little liquid into her that final Friday night, but we didn't prepare anything for her to eat. She stopped breathing in the pre-dawn hours of Saturday. The hospice nurse earlier had planned to start administering morphine early the next week.

I need to review my past posts about that period to see if my memory is more tattered than I think!

ed p.
http://photobucket.com/albums/i76/willru602/
But they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint. Isaiah 40:31
willru602
 
Posts: 1011
Joined: Mon Apr 14, 2003 4:39 pm
Location: Alabama, USA

Postby eplowman » Sat Jan 09, 2010 6:22 pm

Ru,

My books are ancient history now and long out of print. My first one was "The Jesus Movement in America" (Pyramid and D.C. Cook, 1971), a paperback bestseller published in the U.S. and overseas (U.K., Australia, Netherlands, Sweden, and Germany). I coauthored "Washington:Christians in the Corridors of Power" (Tyndale, 1975) with James C. Hefley, a long-time dear friend now in heaven. I authored and co-authored books about Billy Graham's preaching missions to Communist countries in the 1970s and 1980s; my final one was "Billy Graham in China" (BGEA, 1988). Most of my published writing since 1965 has been in the form of news articles for magazines as a staff writer and editor (Christianity Today, World, etc.), with free lance work for the Washington Post, Birmingham News (!), and other newspapers and magazines. Have also lectured on journalism at a number of colleges and universities.

Rose was always after me to "write another bestseller." :)

I had to cut back on work-for-pay after taking up the role of caregiver, and since 2005, much of my writing has been in the form of back and forth with other caregivers here on the forum.

But I'm also still writing for occasional publication. And as I adjust to a new normal without my sweetheart Rose, I'm discovering a new field of interest: widows and widowers who have emerged from a period of grief and adjustment, and are connecting with each other and marrying. (In case you're wondering, I've eliminated myself from the pool of candidates! :) ) I've recruited a widow in Calif. as coauthor, and we've been interviewing couples coast to coast, learning a lot! The book will be for a niche market such as widows-and-widowers support groups, w&w contemplating courtship and marriage, church counselors, etc.

At 78, I hope I can stay well and mobile long enough to finish the project. Besides, I could use the money. :D

Ru, I suspect you will be entertaining children and doing other valued ministry long after I'm gone. Right now, you are consumed full time and then some with caregiving, and for many of us, that's how it should be. Love doesn't require less. But I'm here to testify that caregiving is not the end of the line. I know you to be a woman of faith; greater days are ahead for both you and Will!

All the best,

ed p.
|My wife of 56 years was Rose b. 1930, dx 1999, symptoms from 1997; d. 06/21/08; PSP-rs autopsy confirmed.
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Joined: Tue May 10, 2005 10:22 pm
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